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IndyWatch DIY and Building Feed was generated at Community Resources IndyWatch.

Thursday, 21 September

00:30

Design from A to Z: U Is For Upholstery Design*Sponge

Every day we are surrounded by upholstered furniture like sofas, chairs, benches and everything in between. From lush velvet fabrics to vintage tweed, furniture can be recovered or reupholstered in just about any fabric you can dream up. Thats one thing that I love so much about upholstered furniture you can make it your own, working in your personal style, and fit it into any room of your home. While big projects, like a sofa, might be best left to a professional, there are many weekend DIY projects that you can tackle yourself when it comes to upholstered furniture.

From the many home tours, studio tours, and DIY projects here at Design*Sponge, weve rounded up 10 of our favorite upholstery pieces for your inspiration. Enjoy! Erin

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Wednesday, 20 September

23:30

Maker Spotlight: Elizabeth Kruger Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers

Inspired by what she witnessed at Anime Milwaukee in 2013, Elizabeth Kruger has taken up cosplay to express her creative side.

Read more on MAKE

The post Maker Spotlight: Elizabeth Kruger appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

22:30

Learn the Basics of JavaScript with MakeCode Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers

Without a doubt, one of the most valuable skills in our modern day world is being able to program. One of the best teachers is MakeCode.

Read more on MAKE

The post Learn the Basics of JavaScript with MakeCode appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

11:38

Malta Earthbag Community Center

Malta Earthbag Community Center in Nepal

Malta Earthbag Community Center in Nepal


CASD USA (Common Action for Sustainable Development) is a registered 501(c)3 non-profit that facilitates funding and promotes the programs of our partner, CASD-Nepal, in order to improve quality of life through community-driven, rural development projects.

We have purchased land in a village called Malta in the Lalitpur district. In April, 2017 we began construction using earthbags to build our first community center. It will soon house an existing and thriving womens micro-finance organization (whose previous office was damaged in the earthquake) and a variety of community driven programs.

CASD intends to implement a robust after-school education program for the local children and in-demand classes for adults. Our goal is to provide computer classes, reading and writing instruction, an agriculture program, and possibly domestic abuse counseling and sex education.

The priority is to offer our classroom as a safe space for learning and communication amongst the villagers, and to listen to their needs to determine how we shape the programs.

Common Action for Sustainable Development

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11:38

Rebuilding the Greenhouse: Foundations DIYdiva

Unsurprisingly, spending multiple weeks away from the farm this summer created a serious backlog of work to tackle now that Im home. Some of that is maintenance, some of it is fun work, and some of it is shit I have to do for a second time, because I didnt do it right the first time. Ahem. And then this happened

Untitled

Nothing like some high winds to teach you about not taking shortcuts when youre putting in a little greenhouse. I first built this thing (from a kit) last June, and while I leveled out the foundation with some bricks and gravel and used the provided anchoring system, which was a couple of X-brackets with some rebar driven into the ground.  Im going to be honest and tell you that deep down I did not think this was a good enough foundation for some of the high winds I get out here in the country, but I was far too excited about building the greenhouse (and checking it off the list) than, you know, potentially needing to dig a bunch of holes and haul a lot of concrete into the garden for a proper foundation. So I didnt. And then my greenhouse blew over.

Untitled

Let this be a lesson to all of us, but mostly to me. I know better.

And my penance for knowing better but taking a shortcut is that Ive spent the last five months looking at the broken pieces of my once adorable greenhouse stacked up in my barn all summer.

The good news is that Ive had five months to think on my mistake and figure out how to do it better. And by do it better I mean, figure out how much concrete I can legitimately anchor this thing to the earth with. A thousand pounds? A thousand pounds sounds about right.

So heres the plan.

<href=https://www.flickr.com/photos/kitliz/37162667982/in/dateposted/ title=Untitled>Untitled

If it isnt clear by that super awesome picture (my napkin drawings are getting better sketchup, what??) the new foundation for the greenhouse consists of sinking 6 concrete piers into the ground (8 wide, 4 deep) and then attaching the greenhouse with some 8 anchor bolts.

The greenhouse itself is just panels made up of 22 redwood, strong-tie brackets, and cl...

07:27

Making Your Own Solar Cells from Powdered Donuts? Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers

Make a photovoltaic solar cell using common household items... and donuts!

Read more on MAKE

The post...

04:56

How to survive things you cant change. Funky Junk Interiors

Pallet sofa sign fabric post HERE Every morning, I bring my coffee out to the pallet wood sofa to begin my day. This is the spot where I linger a little too long, waiting until the mental morning fog lifts. It usually takes about 2 cups This little spot became my BFF. It was always there to []

The post How to survive things you cant change. appeared first on Funky Junk Interiors.

02:30

Playful and Layered Design in a Familys Historic Connecticut Home Design*Sponge

Playful and Layered Design in a Familys Historic Connecticut Home | Design*Sponge

Historic homes can come full of surprises and may not be everyones cup of tea, but when Charlotte and Mark Smith had the opportunity to buy a 1854 Federal-style home in Southport, CT, there wasnt really much to debate. It had been on the market for four years and stood empty when the couple came to see it for the first time. Like many other historic houses in the area, it had been slowly neglected and was crying out for some tender loving care. All it took was for Charlotte to see the beautiful sunny windows and wide wood floors to fall endlessly in love. Two and a half years later, Charlotte and Mark have no regrets. The old house has become the perfect place to raise their five children, Eleanor, Oliver, Martha, Louisa and Arthur, and a wonderful project for Charlotte, who loves bringing her familys house to life with small updates and creative ideas.

When Charlotte and Mark, a financial analyst, first moved to Southport from New York City, Charlotte left behind her career as a guidance counselor. To accompany some of her time as a new stay-at-home-mom, she started blogging about her style and unique design ideas. She writes about fixing her familys old house and shares ways to add flea market finds and vintage decor into the mix. For Charlotte, who is now a full-time blogger, mom, and television personality, breathing new life into her familys home is key it means bringing in lots of pattern and color, while always respecting the bones of the historic house and staying true to its style. She wants to ensure that the innate charm is maintained, which in turn has made decorating both a fun and challenging process. Theres nothing standard about old homes!

Charlottes main goal is to create s...

00:30

Before & After: A San Diego Home Balances Restoration & Modernity Design*Sponge

Ashley And Ross' Master Bedroom Details On Design*Sponge

Ross and Ashley Goldman and their cat, Mabel, have lived in their 1915 San Diego, CA craftsman for two years. Much of that time has been spent making their house into a home, highlighting the beautiful original details of the century-old structure, and creating a modern respite fit for sitting back and reflecting on all of their hard work. All of which led Ashley to create a blog to document their renovations, The Gold Hive  a name created from a combination of their last name and the literal hive that was found in their home when they bought it. When shes not working on the house, Ashley can be found at a local art museum where she works on programs with school kids, anthropomorphizing her plants and vintage portraits, or making pies.

Ashley and Ross both grew up in the suburbs, in 70s tract housing, only a few blocks away from each other. When they were looking to purchase their first home, they knew they wanted one with a little more history than those in which they spent their childhoods. Unfortunately, San Diego isnt replete with historic districts. The couple looked for two years before they found their craftsman gem in a neighborhood only 15 minutes from downtown that somehow retains a small-town charm despite its proximity to the city center. With all of the charm, the mom-and-pop shops and restaurants, its not hard to imagine how difficult finding an available house in that neighborhood would be Ross didnt even see their house before Ashley had to put an offer in because he was working out of town (hes an audio engineer for live events) and there were only two days the home was being shown!

One thing the before photos cant accurately depict is the stench that awaited the industrious couple. Ashley remarked that it was so bad at first that they could barely stand inside a delightful combination of old cigar smoke and pet urine. It took us three months of floor refinishing, wall retexturing, cleaning, electrical updates, and a restored bathroom before we could move in. We did a lot upfront to get the house to a place where we could put our things inside, but for the past two years since then, weve taken a slow approach to renov...

Tuesday, 19 September

23:30

Maker Pro News: Maker Health at Maker Faire, Pebble Founders Comeback, and More Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers

Prior to World Maker Faire New York, you will want to take a look at these maker pros and what they've been up to. Some will be at the Faire.

Read more on MAKE

The post Maker Pro News: Maker Health at Maker Faire, Pebble Founders Comeback, and More appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

22:30

Edible Innovations: 7 Food Makers Coming to Maker Faire New York Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers

You'll want to check out these seven food makers at 2017's World Maker Faire New York. Each will be bringing their projects to the Faire.

Read more on MAKE

The post Edible Innovations: 7 Food Makers Coming to Maker Faire New York appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

10:45

Community Rebuilds

Community Rebuilds is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation whose mission is to build energy efficient housing, provide education on sustainability, and improve the housing conditions of the workforce through an affordable program. Community Rebuilds constructs affordable and energy efficient straw bale homes, working with the homeowner and training a dedicated group of volunteer interns on each home project. These interns are young emerging professionals with the desire to participate in an experiential program as they learn how to build low carbon, modern natural buildings.

Program Structure
CR is currently recruiting for the Spring term (February 1st-June 30th) and Fall term (July 16th-December 15th), inviting up to sixteen student interns per project to build strawbale homes from foundation to finish under the direction of a licensed contractor and natural building experts. Interns will contribute to the foundation, frame walls, install bales, apply a variety of natural plasters, pour adobe floors, learn about electrical, plumbing, solar photovoltaics and permaculture, and take part in many other activities necessary to the completion of a home.

Semesters are subject to some variability, as the schedule of any build is dependent on many factors, such as weather and unforeseeable build challenges. However, we assure that you will be an integral part of the current build and will gain an unparalleled amount of natural and conventional construction experience. Additionally, though our internship program primarily consists of onsite, hands-on learning, the experience is occasionally supplemented with workshops, conferences, and field trips. There are no graded assignments, tests, or readings.

Our program is very team-oriented. Interns work together onsite and live together in a home provided by CR. They often get to know our selected homeowners quite well as they work with them side by side in the creation of their home. Similarly, because our CR chapters are located in wonderful, unique communities, interns have many opportunities to make new friends, perhaps volunteer with other awesome organizations, and invest a little piece of themselves into our CR communities. These partnerships are important to our organization which is based on the understanding that we are all neighbors ready to support each other and make our community better.

Community Rebuilds

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03:30

A Midwestern Home Goes from Unlivable to Enviable Design*Sponge

A Midwestern Home Goes from Unlivable to Enviable, Design*Sponge

One day in 2011, while searching Craigslist for rental properties in Minneapolis, MN, graphic designer Claire Moyle and animator Jeffrey Grutter came across a rather odd listing. The landlord of an early-1900s-era bungalow was offering free rent to any family willing to renovate it. Intrigued, the couple immediately set up a showing and prepared themselves for an encounter with what could have been a disastrous home and/or a rather interesting owner. Instead, Claire and Jeffrey found themselves touring a house full of untapped potential accompanied by a landlord who was both friendly and humble. All they truly wanted was someone to help them make the property a winner.

I think youll agree after taking a peek that Claire and Jeffrey have done just that. During their time renting, theyve had floors stained, combined neutral-colored accessories to create an environment thats perfect for unwinding, and painted nearly all the walls. The new paint jobs are amplified even further thanks to Jeffreys artwork. He went to school for painting, and his ability to create simple yet evocative pieces is truly admirable.

While renting, these two revitalized the space beyond recognition, but they gave it a second (even more dramatic) boost after purchasing the home in 2012. Since then theyve replaced the kitchen, landscaped the entire property, nearly finished the basement and painted the exterior a brooding navy that has surely made them the envy of every neighbor. Overall, its a space youre not going to want to miss. Scroll down to check it out, and enjoy! Garrett

Photography by Hannah Voermans

Image above: The Craigslist listing for this home caught Claire and Jeffreys eye because of the odd proposal that accompanied it: the landlord was offering free rent to anyone willing to renovate...

03:16

Register Today for the Make: Education Forum Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers

Join us on Friday, September 22, for the third annual Make: Education Forum in New York.

Read more on MAKE

The post Register Today for the Make: Education Forum appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

IndyWatch DIY and Building Feed Archiver

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IndyWatch DIY and Building Feed was generated at Community Resources IndyWatch.

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