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Saturday, 23 September

03:00

The Internet Hates Secrets: Clear Health Costs Works with Newsrooms to Bring Healthcare Costs Out of Hiding Editor & Publisher

The voicemails would make you want to cry.

When New Orleans WVUE Fox 8 News invited viewers to get in touch and share their healthcare costs, they werent sure what kind of response theyd receive. Would people be willing to dig up the explanation-of-benefits forms theyd received from their insurance companies? Would they be okay sharing what they paid for colonoscopies, MRIs, routine blood tests?

02:04

Christopher Cole Named Editor of the Franklin News-Post Editor & Publisher

Veteran journalist Christopher Cole has been named editor of the Franklin News-Post.

Currently a reporter at the News & Advance in Lynchburg, Coles work includes a series on domestic violence recognized last year with a state press award.

He starts work Monday, Sept. 25, at the News-Post.

01:57

Merce Cunninghams Posthumous Legacy Plan The Paris Review

Revisited is a series in which writers look back on a work of art they first encountered long ago. Here, Eugene Lim revisits the Merce Cunningham Dance Companys final performance, Legacy Plan.

Photo: Daniel Arkham

 

CONAN: How do you obliterate space and time?

Mr. JONES: Well, you know, sometimes, when Ive had one tequila too many and Im lying on the floor, I feel pretty obliterated in space and time. No, but I dont think thats what [Merce] meant.

Bill T. Jones remembering Merce Cunningham, on NPR.

On the few last nights of 2011, I saw a series of performances that so moved and changed me that I thought to myself, This is the greatest experience of art Ive ever had!

And yet because I didnt have the training or the critical terms to note the details of what Id seenand even if Id had them Im not sure the soft muscles of my memory would have retained themI have only emotional and murky impressions. A dance performance I know I once felt was a pinnacle of experience I now can only vaguely hold in mind, like a summer in a foreign city where you carried out a painless and shimmering affairthat is, something idealized and maybe romantic but shrouded and perhaps no longer real.

These were the final dance performances of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, on the nights of December 29th, 30th, and 31st in 2011. Prior to his death, Merce Cunningham created a remarkably prescient and meticulous legacy plan which, after his passing, would send the company on a two-year world tour. It would culminate with final performances in New York. Then, the company would disband.

So even prior to (or outside of) the physical dance, there was already a parallel conc...

01:30

Christ the Savior, Geronimo de Bobadilla, 2nd half of 17th... The Lion of Chaeronea



Christ the Savior, Geronimo de Bobadilla, 2nd half of 17th century

01:20

The Washington Post Enhances In-App Augmented Reality Experience Editor & Publisher

The Washington Post today announced the launch of its first embedded augmented reality story. The Post built an industry-first embed code that lets users trigger an augmented reality experience with 3D visuals and audio narration.

01:19

Changes Ahead for Pulitzers? Stay Tuned, Says New Administrator Editor & Publisher

The Pulitzer Prize Boards July selection of Dana Canedy as its administrator marks, in some ways, a dramatic change for the 101-year-old organization dedicated to honoring the best of American journalism and arts and letters.

Unlike Mike Pride, whose retirement created the opening, she has no prior connection with the Pulitzers except as a lead reporter and editor for a New York Times team that won a 2001 prize for national reporting.

01:18

In Paywall Age, Free Content Remains King for Newspaper Sites Editor & Publisher

The majority of Americas largest newspapers continue to employ digital subscription strategies that prioritize traffic, ad revenues, and promotiondespite the ongoing collapse of display ad rates.

Even as theyve added paying Web subscribers by the hundreds of thousands, daily newspapers have decisively rejected an all-in approach featuring hard website paywalls that mimic their print business models.

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Friday, 22 September

23:31

Reading J. A. Bakers The Peregrine in Fall The Paris Review

Good artists imitate; great artists steal. In our new series, Stolen, writers share stories of theft.

 

It was autumn and warm, late evening, and the shadows were as long as the hot busses that hissed and braked alongside the main librarys midwestern utilitarian grim, lifting trails of dead leaves like a breath of smoke in their wake as they rumbled toward the river. I read the dedication in J. A. Bakers The Peregrine, To My Wife, before dropping the book in my backpack and unlocking my bike. I found it somewhat cheering. At least this neglected author managed to find someone. But over the decades, many readersI later learnedhad come to debate this. They said he never had a wife. They said he lived alone; he was a librarian; he was sick when he wrote the book, hence the melancholy that colors his prose. Others said it was not prose but poetry, while others insisted it wasnt nonfiction but a novel. Even certain filmmakers wanted to lay claim to the text. Werner Herzog told a Rio audience to quit film school. If they wanted to make a movie they had only to read one book: The Peregrine. Classic Herzogian hyperbole, I thought, pushing my bike uphill across the dried grass toward the old capital.

I didnt know it then, but when J. A. Baker was writing his book, the birds themselves stood on the brink of extinction. Pesticides had created the birdless Silent Spring Rachel Carson announced several years earlier. Baker did not anticipate their survival, and his book is less a work of environmental nonfiction than an aching and ecstatic elegy for a dying world. It was fitting perhaps that his book, with its vibrant avocado green flyleaf, the color of 1960s linoleum, had weathered its own private extinction. In the nearly fifty years that the university library had offered the title, it had only been checked out four times. The Date Due slip was last stamped in 1974. A dull $4.95 had been penciled on the top right corner. The book hadnt just been lost, it was dead. It had been dead a long time. They couldnt even sell it.

Along the river, the trees bristled in full autumn plumage. And I thought of the farms behind them and the endless fields of corn, their husks hard, fruit ripe for harve...

20:09

365 Challenge: Day 194 Forgetful This Is My Truth Now

Forgetful: when Jay doesnt remember to take pictures along the way on a day in a trip

forg

Every so often, my brain doesnt work as well as Id like it to work. When that happens, I call myself forgetful. Its not anything to be worried about I am usually not a camera person. Unfortunately, it happened today on a few occasions. I either left my phone in the car or forgot to take pictures. But there were also very few things to take pictures of as we did a lot of driving and looking at real estate in residential areas, which doesnt work well when trying to photograph things to share with everyone. So todays 365 Daily Challenge word is forgetful and I apologize for no fun pictures. More to come tomorrow though; I promise.

Today we drove to Hillsborough, Greensboro, Winston-Salem and a few other smaller towns in between. It was a solid five hours in the car between all the stops and total round-trip distance of the trip. Hillsborough was a great town with a beautiful downtown area. We walked around the residential areas, stopped in the historic Welcome Center and strolled tree-lined streets, popping in and out of small stores. It was also a big site for the Revolutionary War. You should definitely look up and visit this town if youre ever in North Carolina.

The other highlight was Old Salem in Winston-Salem, where I learned it was founded by Moravians, which is a tad ironic given I went to Moravian College. They...

17:30

Production: How to Establish Accurate Receiving Logs and Tracking Procedures in Your Preprint Production Editor & Publisher

Keeping preprint storage areas well-organized can help to locate the correct insert in the shortest amount of time to ensure accuracy and maximize productivity.

Most newspapers receive preprints and/or self-adhesive sticky notes on a regular basis. But what are the recommended and acceptable measures you should take when accepting preprints? Does the receiver verify the amount of product; if so, how? Do you log receivables in by hand or with an electronic tool? What makes up your tracking processes? Do you monitor date and time received, who takes in the insert, the stated quantity verses actual quantity received, number of skids or boxes and date on the pallets?  Internally, are the inserts scheduled and does the order match the product received? Once received and entered into your system are pallets relocated to a racking system establishing a tracking process for final placement and positioning on the floor?

The process involved in receiving preprints isnt as simple as one might believe. Ive worked shops where someone in the mailroom pulls preprints off the truck and they sit outside for half the day, get dragged inside and end up mixed with other preprints scattered around the mailroom area. As you might imagine, this is a recipe for disaster and usually leads to general dysfunction, inaccurate insertions; i.e. inserts going into the wrong product, on the wrong day, shortages, missing insertion dates and ongoing problems with advertisers.

I believe weve all noticed a decline in preprints and the subsequent revenues that we once enjoyed. With digital versions of preprints becoming more and more popular, its just one more thing that keeps us awake at night concerned about the overall health of the printed product. I firmly believe that one small thing we can do to slow this decline is show advertisers and readers alike that we can maintain accurate processes that ensure advertisements end up in the right place on the right day and in the requested amount. Newspapers are in the fight of their lives and anything we can do to maintain our relevance and preserve the advertising dollar should be done now and done right.

Our sales department and advertisers are depending on us to get it right and opera...

17:25

Still Friends michaelwrites

did I say what I meant
too little or too much
or what I thought I could get away with
and still be friends
or stir up old rivalry and animosities we
want to let lie
a little vodka a bad cold
releases me from narrow habits
and I speak my mind

11:04

Aladdin of London (Pemberton) New Online Books

Aladdin of London: or, Lodestar (New York: Empire Book Co., c1907), by Max Pemberton, illust. by Frank Parker (Gutenberg text, illustrated HTML, and page images)

The Man Who Drove the Car (Pemberton) New Online Books

The Man Who Drove the Car (London: E. Nash, 1910), by Max Pemberton (Gutenberg text and illustrated HTML)

The House Under The Sea (Pemberton) New Online Books

The House Under The Sea: A Romance (New York: D. Appleton and Co., 1902), by Max Pemberton, illust. by A. Forestier (stable link)

The Blue Raider (Strang) New Online Books

The Blue Raider: A Tale of Adventure in the Southern Seas (London et al.: H. Milford, Oxford University Press, 1920), by Herbert Strang, illust. by C. E. Brock (Gutenberg text and illustrated HTML)

The Old Man of the Mountain (Strang) New Online Books

The Old Man of the Mountain (London: H. Frowde, Hodder and Stoughton, c1916), by Herbert Strang, illust. by Cyrus Cuneo and Ren Bull (Gutenberg text and illustrated HTML)

The Flying Boat (Strang) New Online Books

The Flying Boat: A Story of Adventure and Misadventure (London: H. Frowde, Hodder and Stoughton, 1912), by Herbert Strang, illust. by Thomas Cantrell Dugdale (Gutenberg text and illustrated HTML)

Quatre Lettres sur le Mexique (Brasseur de Bourbourg) New Online Books

Quatre Lettres sur le Mexique: Exposition Absolue du Systme Hiroglyphique Mexicain; La Fin de Pge de Pierre; poque Glaciaire Temporaire; Commencement De Pge de Bronze; Origines de la Civilisation Et des Religions de L'antiquit; (Collection de Documents Dans les Langues Indigenes v4, in French, with an English appendix by Rafinesque on the Lenape; Paris: F. Brachet; Mexico: Juan Buxo y Cia., 1868), by abb Brasseur de Bourbourg, contrib. by C. S. Rafinesque (stable link)

09:30

Hotarugari (Firefly Catching), from the series Thirty-Six... The Lion of Chaeronea



Hotarugari (Firefly Catching), from the series Thirty-Six Elegant Selections, Toshikata Mizuno, 1891

08:52

Deseret News Names Jeff Simpson President and Publisher Editor & Publisher

Keith B. McMullin, chairman of the Deseret News Publishing Company Board of Directors, today named media veteran Jeff Simpson president and publisher of the Deseret News.

Simpson, a Deseret News board member and president of Deseret Book in Salt Lake City, is an experienced media executive whose career is founded on finding creative solutions to challenges facing media companies. His appointment builds on the foundation laid by the naming of Deseret News editor and head content officer Doug Wilks in November, and head digital officer Burke Olsen in December.

Jeffs record of proven, principled leadership has served our companies well for many years, said McMullin, who is also president of Deseret Management Corp. He now joins a skilled leadership team in furthering the bright future for the Deseret News as its strong local and national voice continues to grow.

Simpson began his career at Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Television. He then built Excel Entertainment Group, which became a successful independent media distributor which was later acquired by Desert Book. Thereafter, he served as president and CEO of Bonneville International, which oversees KSL Broadcasting and other broadcast entities.

Simpson will maintain his position as president of Deseret Book and will assume his new responsibilities immediately.

Im excited to join this team of professionals at the Deseret News, Simpson said. In a crowded media landscape, we take seriously our role to be a valued news and information source and to be a watchdog, protecting the rights and interests of families and society based on principles of truth.

06:30

Facebook on Local News Partnerships: Were Just Getting Started Editor & Publisher

Once a self-defined technology company, Facebook recently launched the Facebook Journalism Project to meet the needs of a news industry that spoke in near-unison in saying it benefited too little from all the free editorial content it made available to the giant distribution platform.

In this Q & A, Josh Mabry, manager of Facebooks local news partnerships, details what FB is doing and plans to do at the community level of the news industry:

06:00

St. Louis Post-Dispatch Demands Charges Be Dropped Against Reporter Covering Protest Editor & Publisher

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch on Wednesday condemned the inappropriate and highly disturbing arrest of one of its journalists on Sunday during a mass arrest by St. Louis police officers, and demanded that the city drop charges against him.

In a letter to Mayor Lyda Krewson, Acting Police Chief Lawrence OToole, City Counselor Julian Bush and Deputy City Counselor Michael Garvin, a lawyer for the newspaper also demanded that the city implement protocols to prevent any recurrence of arrests of journalists who are covering these important events and who are engaged in no criminal activity whatsoever.

05:30

Susanna and the Elders, Artemisia Gentileschi, ca. 1610 The Lion of Chaeronea



Susanna and the Elders, Artemisia Gentileschi, ca. 1610

05:30

CNN Digital is Facing a $20 Million Budget Shortfall Editor & Publisher

CNN has been pouring money into its digital operation making new hires and renewing its focus on web video and mobile devices.

Now, CNN Digital is facing a budget pinch, according to six people familiar with the matter. The shortfall, which according to three of the people amounts to about $20 million, has been enough to spark some end-of-the-year belt-tightening.

04:55

Lillian Ross, Acclaimed Reporter for The New Yorker, Dies at 99 Editor & Publisher

Lillian Ross, who became known as the consummate fly-on-the-wall reporter in more than six decades at The New Yorker, whether writing about Ernest Hemingway, Hollywood or a busload of Indiana high school seniors on a class trip to New York, died on Wednesday in Manhattan. She was 99.

Her longtime editor, Susan Morrison, said the death, at Lenox Hill Hospital, was caused by a stroke.

04:45

The Sunday Times Takes its Fashion Videos from Behind the Paywall Editor & Publisher

The Times of London and the Sunday Times has a loyal subscriber base, but for luxury advertisers hungry for video, paywalls are limiting. Since Sept. 17, Style, the Sunday Times weekly print fashion supplement, has published daily videos in front of its paywall to build its audience and give advertisers a way to reach the audience every day, rather than weekly in print.

 

04:15

Publishers Continue to See Monetization Problems with Apple News Editor & Publisher

Apples Safari update that limits ad trackers isnt the only sign of the companys disdain toward advertising. In January, after all but giving up on selling ads itself, the tech giant started having NBCUniversal sell ads in Apple News, Apples news aggregation app. Nine months later, the deal has borne little fruit, according to publishers and sources close to them.

03:30

New Project at Georgetown to Track Free Speech Incidents Across Country Editor & Publisher

A new two-year academic inquiry at Georgetown, funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, is documenting and analyzing hundreds of incidents around the country in which free speech has been challenged.

The Free Speech Project, directed by Sanford J. Ungar, a veteran journalist and former college president, will study the condition of free speech in America today, both in higher education and in civil society.

03:30

Why Write Limericks for John Ashbery The Paris Review

For me, Ashbery was the sky.

I was with some poetry friends in a pub near Holborn, shooting the breeze before a reading two of us were participating in. The breeze was fairly dark on that day, for various reasons. It was the weekend following Donald Trumps inauguration for one thing; it was January in London for another. Let us hope that it was genuine curiosity, at least as much as the need to keep the conversation going, that caused one friend to ask which poet I thought of as the main background presence for my own writing. He did not quite phrase the question in terms of influence. I did not have to think to know that the answer was John Ashbery. But for some reason, the name felt a little flat on my tongue, as if this was an important fact about myself that I had not been nourishing or had grown inattentive to. Further comment seemed called for, and what I found myself saying next was that, for me, Ashbery was the sky. It was true, and of course it remains so. The sky is not something that just goes and dies one day.

But then, what is it that we actually get from the sky? Both everything and nothing. My friend seemed surprised by my answer. Perhaps Ashbery is by now so pervasive in my stuff that he no longer shows through on the surface. I first started reading him intensely within the mainly hapless ambit of the 1990s British poetry world, a fate which left me absurdly free to treat him more or less as a personal discovery, and to make of him what I would, or could. The conversation in the pub seemed a good prompt to attempt a more open reckoning with him, to turn back toward him in acknowledgement perhaps.

One afternoon shortly thereafter, I found myself wondering whether Ashbery, whose admiration for Edward Lear is well attested, had ever written limericks. I may stand corrected, but my light research showed he had not, and so I quickly decided to write some for him. Once it had offered itself, the dare felt fairly irresistible and the faint tang of presumptuousness seemed like just another creative obstacle to be surpassed on the path to riffing off of Ashberys own impishness. The piece did indeed then pretty much write itself, except that I could not get it to feel finished. One obvious danger was that I might write too many of them. I...

03:00

Univision is Trying Out WhatsApp to Distribute News and Information During Hurricane Emergencies Editor & Publisher

Newsrooms well-worn refrain about their audiences we need to meet them where they are means something more urgent in the middle of a category five hurricane.

Where are the shelters? Where can I get water and food? Where is the storm now?

01:30

Sunny Morning on the Hudson River, Thomas Cole, 1827 The Lion of Chaeronea



Sunny Morning on the Hudson River, Thomas Cole, 1827

01:30

Human Life Is Punishment, and Other Pleasures of Studying Latin The Paris Review

From the Cambridge Latin Course 4th Edition.

The Iowa Writers Workshop, where I am currently enrolled, doesnt require you to do much of anything. Time is largely unstructured here; as long as your writing gets done, you barely have to get out of bed for two years. When I first realized this, I panicked, and then I registered for an undergraduate course in elementary Latin. I dont even get academic credit for it. I just wanted something in my life, amidst the subjective muck of the creative process, that I could be objectively good atthe occasional dopamine rush of a check mark, an A grade, a scribbled Great job! from an authority figureand I remembered being good at Latin.

It had been almost two decades since I last looked at a Latin textbook, but I was optimistic that Id retained a lot. My seventh-grade Latin textbook left a vivid impression on me. It followed the fictionalized adventures of a real-life Pompeian household (vocab words for the final chapter included volcano, to erupt, smoke, ashes, in despair), and to this day, I remember the whole cast of characters: Caecilius, a banker; Metella, his wife; Grumio, their cook; and Cerberus, the dog, who stays by his masters side to the very end (RIP, little buddy). Ill never forget the passage in which Melissa, a newly purchased slave girl, is first presented to the household: my translation was Melissa pleases Caecilius. Melissa pleases Grumio. Uh-ohMelissa does not please Metella! It was pretty juicy material, by seventh-grade standards. (I just Googled these names, so I can tell you that the book was The Cambridge Latin Course: Book 1, and that it has a surprisingly robust fandom on Tumblr.)

My middle school required two years of Latin, and the worse I did socially, the better I did at Latin. At the social nadir of my seventh-grade year, on the heels of my thirteenth birthday and my parents divorce, my best friend unexpectedly dumped me dramatically in a crowded school hallway. Youre a BITCH from HELL, she shouted in my face, so FUCK OFF! I had never had such language directed at m...

01:26

Google and Facebook Tighten Grip on US Digital Ad Market Editor & Publisher

Its no longer news to say that Google and Facebook dominate the US digital ad market. But this year that supremacy is exceeding expectations, according to eMarketers latest digital ad spending forecast.

The digital ad ecosystems so-called duopoly is now expected to rake in a combined 63.1% of US digital ad investment in 2017, up from eMarketers previous prediction that the duos total would reach 60.4% in 2017.

01:25

Local Newsrooms in Philadelphia and Beyond Get $2 Million in Grant Funding From Lenfest Editor & Publisher

The Philadelphia Media Network, which includes The Philadelphia Inquirer and the Philadelphia Daily News, has received a grant for $1 million from the Lenfest Institute for Journalism.

Lenfest also announced an additional $1 million for a variety of local journalism projects, newsrooms and innovators, both in Philadelphia and beyond.

01:24

Sheryl Sandberg Called Facebooks Ad-Targeting Embarrassment Totally Inappropriate and a Fail on Our Part Editor & Publisher

The ad-targeting feature that allowed Facebook advertisers to target Jew haters and other offensive labels was totally inappropriate and a fail on our part, according to Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg.

Sandberg posted on Wednesday to express disappointment with the companys embarrassing targeting options and explain Facebooks plan to rectify the situation.

Thursday, 21 September

23:30

Help! Infectious Boredom and Pee-Hoarding Roommates The Paris Review

Have a question for Lynda BarryEmail us.

A self-portrait by Lynda Barry.

 

Dear Lynda,

When you get bored, and youre so bored you dont even want to do anything to break up the boredomits that creeping, infectious boredom thats kind of like an angerhow do you avoid drinking too much?

Thanks,

Tipsy in Texas

 

Dear Tipsy,

Boredom has a hard time letting go of the remote control, so the secret is to get your body out of range so it cant reach you. The remote control that boredom holds is your phone. Leave it behind, and sneak calmly out the back way. Get a ride to a bar that is about ninety-minutes walk from your place then go in, (phoneless!) and order your favorite drink and pound it. Drink it really, really fast. Then have one more really, really fast. Tip your bartender and head out, thinking of a question that youd love to know the answer to, big or small. As you begin to walk home (possibly getting a little lost along the way as you are buzzed and phoneless) tell yourself that you will encounter three clues to the answer to this question in the next ninety minutes.Tell yourself one will be in the form of a person, one will be in the form of trash or something laying on the ground, and one will be something located above eye level. When you get back home, sneak past boredom (it will be easy because boredom will be glued to your phone) and get a piece of paper and write down ten things that happened or that you did during your walk. Then look at your list and write down what you were looking at when those things were happening. Pick one of the things from either list and write about it in the first person present tense, like its happening right now. Start with your location, describe the setting and then write nonstop for eight minutes. Now write your question and spend three minutes writing the answer. In less than two hours youll have a big experience that boredom wont know anything about because its still on your phone, sucked into the vortex you managed to free yourself from for a little while. And boredom cant read your ha...

22:30

An Epitaph for Achilles Son The Lion of Chaeronea

Ausonius, Epitaphia heroum qui bello Troico interfuerunt 9 Pyrrho

Notes: the middle of the world: Orestes killed Pyrrhus/Neoptolemus at Delphi, where a stone known as the omphalosmarked what was thought to be the geographic center of the world.  the spoils of a king: Priam.

I am buried at the middle of the world-
I who showed greater valor
Than my father did, for I,
Pyrrhus, still a boy,
Won the spoils of a king.
Wicked Orestes slew me
Before the altars, by trickery-
But why be shocked? Already
He was mad from his mothers murder.

Orbe tegor medio, maior virtute paterna,
    quod puer et regis Pyrrhus opima tuli.
Impius ante aras quem fraude peremit Orestes-
    quid mirum? caesa iam genetrice furens.

Pyrrhus and Andromache before Hectors Tomb, Johan Ludwig Lund, between 1807 and 1811

17:30

Industry Insight: Want to Build Trust? Start with a Good Corrections Policy Editor & Publisher

The more corrections a news organization runs, the more likely I am to trust it.

In the still-insular culture of todays newsrooms, the number of corrections doesnt necessarily correlate to the number of mistakes made. But those that regularly run corrections, and in a manner thats prominent and transparent to readers, show a commitment to addressing mistakes and accountability.

If all you ever heard about the (New York Times) or AP or CNN or Fox were the corrections, youd think they were terrible, CNN Reliable Sources host Brian Stelter wrote on Twitter recently. Theyre not.

His comments came in the wake of CNN retracting a story about a Trump supporters ties to Russia and announcing the departure of several staff members (veteran journalists) who were involved in writing and editing it.

Trump-supporting websites seized on the admission to paint mainstream media coverage in general as fake news that is biased and unfair to the president.

Elad Nehorai, a Brooklyn writer who has contributed to the Guardian and HuffPost and blogs at PopChassid.com, took the opposite lesson.

The fact that they issue corrections is what makes them quality media! he wrote in response to Stelters point. Im looking forward to the day an extreme right site does the same.

Thats an obvious starting point for news organizations who want to combat the presidents attempts to undermine trust in the press with a fake news mantra, and those who hope or expect to rely on direct financial support from readers.

The first step in building community trust is to have an awesome corrections policy, and to follow it religiously. Craig Silverman, who used to publish the site Regret the Error and now leads Buzzfeeds coverage of the media, has been preaching this for years.

Silverman has been a leading voice about how to handle corrections as journalism has moved online and newsrooms have faced a whole set of new issues around the speed of coverage and the temptation to quietly make changes in an online story that was wrong without acknowledging that you made...

16:02

365 Challenge: Day 193 Touring This Is My Truth Now

Touring: wandering around checking out all the important stuff

tour

Today started off with a quick drive through Chapel Hill and then we took off for Duke University in Durham. We wandered the campus and saw a bunch of beautiful old buildings and chapels. It was over 90 degrees in the sun, so I kept looking for shady areas. I also felt guilty because students were in classes and I got to spend the morning touring. After, we went to the gardens and had a golf cart drive us around for part of the way before we walked the rest on our own. So many great trees and flowers. Best part of the day!

We had lunch in the downtown area and shopped in old village stores. We later drove to Raleigh and checked out neighborhoods. A few cool ones and a few run down ones. Toured the state capitol building which was awesome. I think Charlotte is still the nicest of all the cities, but we have more to see tonight in Cary and downtown Raleigh. Off to meet a friends sister for dinner. A home cooked meal! No touring tonight but back at it tomorrow with Greensboro and Winston Salem. See ya soon. Enjoy the pics.

...

14:30

Lost Poem michaelwrites

I keep trying to remember the lines
I composed while I was meditating
trying not to think in words I forgot
on purpose then regret the lost poem

13:32

justspace: Relativistic jets powered by the supermassive... The Lion of Chaeronea



justspace:

Relativistic jets powered by the supermassive blackhole Centaurus A

js

12:11

A Bizarre Company (Fry) New Online Books

A Bizarre Company (London: Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent and Co., 1913), by G. M. C. Fry (page images at Princeton)

An Alphabet of Fairy Tales (Pailthorpe) New Online Books

An Alphabet of Fairy Tales (London: Gale and Polden, Ltd., 1920), by Doris Pailthorpe (page images at Princeton)

The Children of Many Nations and the ABC (Hodgman) New Online Books

The Children of Many Nations and the ABC (Rochester, NY: Stecher Lith. Co., 1916), by Carolyn S. Hodgman, illust. by William F. Stecher (page images at Princeton)

ABC Health Cards New Online Books

ABC Health Cards (New York: American Child Health Association, 1915) (page images at Princeton)

Edward Lear's ABC (Lear) New Online Books

Edward Lear's ABC (London: H. Frowde, Hodder and Stoughton, ca. 1913), by Edward Lear (page images at Princeton)

The Character and Influence of the Indian Trade in Wisconsin (Turner) New Online Books

The Character and Influence of the Indian Trade in Wisconsin: A Study of the Trading Post as an Institution (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1891), by Frederick Jackson Turner (Gutenberg text)

August Folly (Thirkell) New Online Books

August Folly (c1936), by Angela Thirkell (HTML in Canada; NO US ACCESS)

Miss Bunting (Thirkell) New Online Books

Miss Bunting (c1945), by Angela Thirkell (HTML in Canada; NO US ACCESS)

Kif (Daviot) New Online Books

Kif: An Unvarnished History (c1929), by Gordon Daviot (HTML in Canada; NO US ACCESS)

The Privateer (Daviot) New Online Books

The Privateer (c1952), by Gordon Daviot (HTML in Canada; NO US ACCESS)

Richard of Bordeaux (Daviot) New Online Books

Richard of Bordeaux: A Play in Two Acts (c1933), by Gordon Daviot (HTML in Canada; NO US ACCESS)

The Man In The Queue (Tey) New Online Books

The Man In The Queue (c1929), by Josephine Tey (HTML in Canada; NO US ACCESS)

Leith Sands, and Other Short Plays (Daviot) New Online Books

Leith Sands, and Other Short Plays (c1946), by Gordon Daviot (multiple formats in Canada; NO US ACCESS)

Plays by Gordon Daviot (Daviot) New Online Books

Plays by Gordon Daviot (3 volumes, c1953-1954), by Gordon Daviot (multiple formats in Canada; NO US ACCESS)

A New Theory of Acute and Slow Continued Fevers (Cheyne) New Online Books

A New Theory of Acute and Slow Continued Fevers: Wherein, Beside The Appearance of Such, and The Manner of Their Cure, Occasionally, The Structure of The Glands, and The Manner of Laws of Secretion, The Operation of Purgative, Vomitive, and Mercurial Medicines, Are Mechanically Explained; To Which Is Prefix'd an Essay Concerning The Improvements of The Theory of Medicine (8th edition, corrected; London: Printed for W. Otridge, 1766), by George Cheyne (page images at NIH)

Nature's Assistant to the Restoration of Health In a Variety of Complaints (Hodson) New Online Books

Nature's Assistant to the Restoration of Health In a Variety of Complaints: To Which Is Added, an Address to Parents, Tutors, and Schoolmasters, With Advice to Young Men and Boys, Respecting a Destructive Habit of a Private Nature (13th edition; London: Printed by E. Hodson, 1794), by James Hodson (page images at NIH)

Nature's Assistant to the Restoration of Health; To Which is Added a Short Treatise on the Venereal Disease, Recommending a Safe, Easy, and Proper Mode of Treatment; Also, an Essay on Gleets, Seminal Weaknesses, and the Destructive Habit of Self-Pollution (Hodson) New Online Books

Nature's Assistant to the Restoration of Health; To Which is Added a Short Treatise on the Venereal Disease, Recommending a Safe, Easy, and Proper Mode of Treatment; Also, an Essay on Gleets, Seminal Weaknesses, and the Destructive Habit of Self-Pollution (6th edition; London: J. Matthews, 1789), by James Hodson (page images at NIH)

Nature's Assistant to the Restoration of Health; To Which is Added a Short Treatise on the Venereal Disease, Recommending a Safe, Easy, and Proper Mode of Treatment; Also, an Essay on Gleets, Seminal Weaknesses, and a Destructive Habit of a Private Nature (Hodson) New Online Books

Nature's Assistant to the Restoration of Health; To Which is Added a Short Treatise on the Venereal Disease, Recommending a Safe, Easy, and Proper Mode of Treatment; Also, an Essay on Gleets, Seminal Weaknesses, and a Destructive Habit of a Private Nature (11th edition; London: E. Hodson, 1791), by James Hodson (page images at NIH)

Quatre Lettres sur le Mexique (Brasseur de Bourbourg) New Online Books

Quatre Lettres sur le Mexique: Exposition Absolue du Systme Hiroglyphique Mexicain; La Fin de Pge de Pierre; poque Glaciaire Temporaire; Commencement De Pge de Bronze; Origines de la Civilisation Et des Religions de L'antiquit; (in French, with an English appendix by Rafinesque on the Lenape; Paris: F. Brachet; Mexico: Juan Buxo y Cia., 1868), by abb Brasseur de Bourbourg, contrib. by C. S. Rafinesque (stable link)

The New Dispensatory (Lewis) New Online Books

The New Dispensatory: The Whole Interspersed with Practical Cautions and Observations (sixth edition; London: Printed for F. Wingrave et al., ca. 1799), by William Lewis (page images at NIH)

A New Treatise on The Venereal Disease, Gleets, Seminal Weaknesses; The Dreadful Effects of Self-Pollution; and The Causes of Impotency, Directing Methods of Cure Established by Repeated Experience (Smyth) New Online Books

A New Treatise on The Venereal Disease, Gleets, Seminal Weaknesses; The Dreadful Effects of Self-Pollution; and The Causes of Impotency, Directing Methods of Cure Established by Repeated Experience (sixth edition; London: Printed for the author, 1771), by J. H. Smyth (page images at NIH)

Chief Joseph's Own Story (Joseph) New Online Books

Chief Joseph's Own Story (reprinted from the North American Review, April 1879, with additional material), by Nez Perc Chief Joseph, contrib. by Donald MacRae and William Hobart Hare (multiple formats at archive.org)

The Conspiracy Trial for the Murder of the President, and the Attempt To Overthrow the Government by the Assassination of Its Principal Officers (Poore) New Online Books

The Conspiracy Trial for the Murder of the President, and the Attempt To Overthrow the Government by the Assassination of Its Principal Officers (3 volumes; Boston: J. E. Tilton and Co., 1865-1866), ed. by Benjamin Perley Poore (stable link)

The Frontier in American History (Turner) New Online Books

The Frontier in American History (New York: Henry Holt and Co., 1920), by Frederick Jackson Turner (multiple formats at archive.org)

Message from the President of the United States to the Two Houses of Congress at the Commencement of The Second Session of The Forty-Seventh Congress, With the Reports of the Heads of Departments and Selections from Accompanying Documents (Poore) New Online Books

Message from the President of the United States to the Two Houses of Congress at the Commencement of The Second Session of The Forty-Seventh Congress, With the Reports of the Heads of Departments and Selections from Accompanying Documents (Washington: GPO, 1882), ed. by Benjamin Perley Poore, contrib. by Chester Alan Arthur (multiple formats at archive.org)

The American Nations (Rafinesque) New Online Books

The American Nations: or, Outlines of Their General History, Ancient and Modern (2 volumes; Philadelphia: C. S. Rafinesque, 1836), by C. S. Rafinesque (stable link)

A Lei do Ventre Livre (Ensaio de Historia Parlamentar) (Morais) New Online Books

A Lei do Ventre Livre (Ensaio de Historia Parlamentar) (in Portuguese; Rio de Janeiro: Imprensa Nacional, 1917), by Evaristo de Morais (page images at HathiTrust; US access only)

The Bengal Settlement Manual, 1908 (Bengal ) New Online Books

The Bengal Settlement Manual, 1908 (Kolkata: Bengal Secretariat Book Depot, 1909), by Bengal Revenue Department and H. McPherson (page images at HathiTrust; US access only)

The Indian Penal Code, as Originally Framed in 1837, With Notes (Indian Law Commission) New Online Books

The Indian Penal Code, as Originally Framed in 1837, With Notes (Chennai: Higginbotham, 1888), by Indian Law Commission, contrib. by Thomas Babington Macaulay Macaulay, J. M. Macleod, G. W. Anderson, F. Millett, C. H. Cameron, and D. Eliott (page images at HathiTrust; US access only)

09:30

The Dance Lesson, Edgar Degas, ca. 1879 The Lion of Chaeronea



The Dance Lesson, Edgar Degas, ca. 1879

06:45

If You Look for Money You are Likely To Get It: Report Highlights The Priorities of Media Executives Over the Next Five Years Editor & Publisher

The biggest challenge to media organisations is not posed by technology or declining revenue, but by the firms own inabiliaties to innovate, a study of nearly 250 media leaders from around the world found.

Francois Nel of the Faculty of Culture and Creative Industries at University of Central Lancashire, and Coral Milburn-Curtis of Green Templeton College, University of Oxford, analysed almost 250 responses from media executives in 68 countries to find out the priorities for investment in each organisation and compare them across the industry.

06:00

This Online Dashboard is Monitoring Russian Propaganda About the German Election Editor & Publisher

With the German election less than a week away, its clear that fake news while frequently targeting Chancellor Angela Merkel isnt really influencing the campaign. But that hasnt stopped Russian trolls and media outlets from trying.

A new project launched last week by the Alliance for Securing Democracy (ASD) is tracking those attempts, which are increasingly aimed at bolstering right-wing populist groups like the Alternative for Germany party (AfD).

05:30

Sculpture of a seated girl, known as the Conservatori Girl.... The Lion of Chaeronea



Sculpture of a seated girl, known as the Conservatori Girl.  Roman copy of the Hadrianic period, possibly after a lost Greek original of the school of Lysippus.  Found in the temple of Minerva Medica in the Horti Liciniani, Rome; now in the Capitoline Museums.  Photo credit:  Marie-Lan Nguyen / Wikimedia Commons.

05:00

Avoiding the Sugar Rush: Inside the BBCs Slow News Operation Editor & Publisher

In the last eight months, BBC News has undergone a major reprioritizing exercise focused on creating what the organization now calls slow news journalism.

Thats meant moving away from pursuing every incremental breaking news update toward publishing fewer but more thoroughly contextualized in-depth stories, as well as more short data visualization pieces.

04:57

"Thats what makes me sad: life is so different from books. I wish it were the same: clear, logical,..." The Lion of Chaeronea

Thats what makes me sad: life is so different from books. I wish it were the same: clear, logical, organized. Only it isnt.

- Pierrot le fou (1965), Dir. Jean-Luc Godard
(via wordsnquotes)

04:30

Quartz is Using Apples New AR Tech to Help People Understand Objects In The News on iPhones Editor & Publisher

Of all the emerging technologies that Apple has its eyes on, CEO Tim Cook has seemed particularly excited about augmented reality. Before long, many people will have AR experiences every day, almost like eating three meals a day. It will become that much a part of you, Cook predicted at a tech conference last year.

03:45

In Mexico, It is the State, Not the Cartels, That Poses The Biggest Threat to Journalists Editor & Publisher

Marijose Gamboa has one of the most dangerous occupations in the world. Shes a journalist in the Mexican state of Veracruz, and the things she has endured for her work are comparable to the brutalities suffered by prisoners of war, including imprisonment, torture, and sexual assault.

03:30

Neil the Horse Rides Again The Paris Review


The 1980s was the decade of the black-and-white comic boomand the inevitable bust. The boom was started in part by three successful self-published comics: Kevin Eastman and Peter Lairds Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Wendy and Richard Pinis Elfquest, and Dave Sims Cerebus the Aardvark. A comic-reading public that wanted something besides the same tired superhero formula or the sex-and-drugs heavy (and often misogynist) underground comics snapped them up. The black-and-white pages were cheaper to print than color, and soon new publishers with new titles were springing up like toadstools after a rainstorm.

At first it seemed as though any black-and-white comic book would sell (and at first they did), and there were some pretty bizarre but briefly successful books with titles, like Cold Blooded Chameleon Commandos or The Pre-Teen Dirty-Gene Kung-Fu Kangaroos, riding on the armored coattails of Ninja Turtles, but along with the silliness came some good comics that are still with us, like Bob Burdens Flaming Carrot, Stan Sakais Usagi Yojimbo, Max Collins and Terry Beattys Ms. Tree, and Joshua Quagmires Cutey Bunny, and some good comics that unfortunately didnt last, like Bill Messner-Loebss Journey, and the subject of this essay.

In the midst of the hysteria of the black-and-white boom, along came Neil the Horse, tap dancing his way into the hearts of America. (Well, mine, anyway, and enough others to keep the comic going for fifteen issues.) Five parts Donald Duck artist Carl Barks, five parts Fred Astaire, and a hundred percent Arn Saba, the banana-chomping, rubber-legged equines comics were a refreshing change from the dark, grim and gritty, ultraviolent mainstream comics that seemed almost de rigueur during the eighties. His Art Decolooking characters sang and danced their way through some pretty wacky adventures: inspired by the manic adventures of Donald Duck and Scrooge McDuck, along with a healthy dose of surrealism la Winsor McCays Little Nemo, Neil got caught in a photocopier, producing hundreds of Neil clones; he met Mr. Coffee Nerves and consumed a gallon of the stuff, with expected rubber-legged results, and he and his cigar-chomping pal, Soapy the Cat, went to Hell (not as a result of drinking all that coffee!)....

03:00

Facebook Gives, But Continues to Take More From Publishers Editor & Publisher

For all the steps Facebook has taken to support publishers, two new reports offer a stark reminder of whos really in charge. Parse.ly data shows that across its 2,500-site network, Facebook declined as a source of referral traffic to publishers, with Google surpassing the social network to become the biggest referrer.

01:30

Portrait of a Youth in an Embroidered Vest (Portrait of Zamor),... The Lion of Chaeronea



Portrait of a Youth in an Embroidered Vest (Portrait of Zamor), Marie-Victoire Lemoine, 1785

01:30

The Surprising History (and Future) of Paperweights The Paris Review

Illustration by Ellis Rosen

On a Friday night this spring, I reported to the inaugural show at Fisher Parrish Gallery, in Bushwick. Some awfully cool looking folks were packed into the small white space. The table was laid with 117 new examples of paperweights. Almost none of them resembled the office accoutrement of last century, when open windows and fans sent paper sailing through reeking cigarette fog. These were objet dart. They ranged from the purely ironic (a furry outgrowth) to the purely beautiful (chain links encrusted in sherbet crystals). Many were ineffable abstracts, and a few were just satisfying (animal figurines drilled into each other). My life doesnt justify a paperweight, a girlfriend remarked. My life isnt settled enough. You dont buy one until you think youre not going to move.

Paperweights had never struck me as markers of stability. But a month later, when I was laid off from the legacy media company where I worked for a print magazine, I surveyed my desk, picked up a stack of our branded notepads and a handle of whiskey and thought, At least I dont have to lug no paperweight.  

Then Saturday came without Saturdays feel. In a vintage shop, I drifted from taxidermy pheasants to a shelf staged with dusted curio, and there was a Murano blown-glass paperweight. At its center, the softball-size bubble had a clear tubular ring, inside of which was a clear finial shape from which streaks of red sprayed in arches at 360 degrees. The thing was maybe five pounds? My fianc found me cradling it to my heart. Youre going to bring that home, arent you, he said, meaning: Did my foolhardy troth to paper in the age of new media know no bounds? The paperweight seemed to englobe our opposed perspectives: he thought it looked like a nasty vortex; I thought it looked like a wine fountain.

In 1495, a historian from Venice remarked, But consider to whom did it occur to include in a little ball all the sorts of flowers which clothe the meadow in Spring. He was referring to the glasswork techniques the Romans had picked up from the Egyptians. The results were not paperweights, not least because the bottoms had not yet been shaved flat to prevent rolling. That was an evolution Paul Holliste...

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